"Liberty is not for these slaves; I do not advocate inflicting it against their conscience. On the contrary, I am strongly in favor of letting them crawl and grovel all they please before whatever fraud or combination of frauds they choose to venerate…Our whole practical government is grounded in mob psychology and the Boobus Americanus will follow any command that promises to make him safer." -- H. L. Mencken

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House Speaker Mike Johnson's newly unveiled foreign aid bill includes over $26 billion for Israel -- $12 billion more than the previous bill which asked for $14 billion -- $61 billion for Ukraine and absolutely nothing to secure America's borders.

As Sen. Rand Paul notes, Johnson is also putting forward bills to ban TikTok (to silence criticism of Israel) and seize Russia's assets to give to Ukraine in an act of war (the REPO Act).

More than a century ago, in the middle of bustling Hollywood Boulevard, a man with a dream and a passion for shoes opened a small, unassuming shop. Salvatore Ferragamo's journey began here, but his story soon took on a mythological tone. Located directly opposite the iconic Egyptian Theatre, Ferragamo's store soon became synonymous with Hollywood glamour, earning him the coveted title of "shoemaker to the stars". Ferragamo shoes were not just shoes; They were works of art that graced the finest stages of the silver screen. Their innovative designs and impeccable craftsmanship set them apar
Located in northeastern France, Alsace is a region filled with a rich and complex history, often serving as a cultural crossroads between France and Germany. This unique status is reflected in its hearty cuisine, charming villages and distinctive traditions. One such tradition is the Schlupfkapp, a bright headdress that was once a hallmark of Alsatian women's attire. Literally translating to "slip cap" in German, the Schluffcap is anything but subtle – a voluminous bow that has taken over both fashion and social identity in the region.
There are over 100 million buildings in the world, a number that is absolutely staggering when you try to wrap your head around it. Before settling down and building structures, people were nomadic for thousands of years – that was, of course, 1.8 million years ago. Mostly, these buildings were simple structures consisting of four walls and a roof. Over time, people learned better techniques and began creating more elaborate structures, similar to the ones we are examining today. From that time to the present day, people have built many remarkable man-made structures.

Russia was able to destroy a key power plant serving Kyiv because Ukraine ran out of defensive missiles, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has claimed.

Speaking to US news outlet PBS on Tuesday, Zelenskyy’s comments follow repeated warnings from his government to its allies about scarce air defences. Ukraine is desperately calling for ammunition as Russia scales up strikes on its infrastructure.

Mixing religion with politics is generally not a good idea. Still, it looks like it is one of the few remaining options to avoid what then-Senator Sam Nunn and his colleagues  described in 2020 as continuing to sleepwalk towards a nuclear WWIII.

The new law further simplifies draft procedures, with all Ukrainians obliged to “update data” on themselves with the military authorities within 60 days after the legislation comes into force. The provision applies to Ukrainians living abroad as well. 

Iran’s retaliatory strikes against Israel were not conducted alone. Strategic partners Russia and China have Tehran’s back, and their role in West Asia’s conflict will only grow if the US doesn’t keep Israel in check.

Russia is withdrawing its peacekeepers from Karabakh, a region that had previously seceded from Azerbaijan, the Kremlin confirmed on Wednesday.

Presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov said reports of the move that had appeared in Azerbaijani media were correct.