Our sun just set a record for spotlessness: In 2019, the sun has been without sunspots for more than 270 days: Some scientists are predicting we are entering a mini-ice-age (what do you think?) | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Our sun just set a record for spotlessness: In 2019, the sun has been without sunspots for more than 270 days: Some scientists are predicting we are entering a mini-ice-age (what do you think?)

Solar Minimum has just become very deep indeed. With weather records being smashed all over the world this year, our Star has jumped on the bandwagon too. Last weekend, our sun, set a space-age record for spotlessness (quietness).

So far in 2019, the sun has been without sunspots for more than 270 days, including the last 33 days in a row ( which is 77% of the time this year). Since the Space Age began, no other year has had this many blank suns. The previous record-holder was the year 2008 when the sun was blank for 268 days. That was during the epic Solar Minimum of 2008-2009, formerly the deepest of the Space Age. Now 2019 has moved into first place.

Solar Minimum is a normal part of the 11-year sunspot cycle. The past two (2008-2009 and 2018-2019) have been long and deep, making them "century-class" Minima. To find a year with more blank suns, you have to go back to 1913, which had 311 spotless days. Last week, the NOAA/NASA Solar Cycle Prediction Panel issued a new forecast. Based on a variety of predictive techniques, they believe that the current Solar Minimum will reach its deepest point in April 2020 (+/- 6 months) followed by a new Solar Maximum in July 2025. This means that low sunspot counts and weak solar activity could continue for some time to come.

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